Je bent niet aangemeld · aanmelden · registreer
 

Overlegpagina van JeroenZutphen14

Nieuw onderwerp toevoegen

Recent overleg

Meer...

Toon enkel overleg in het Nederlands
Archief

Archief


Baumfan1964, op 2014-10-16 20:35:53, zei:
wonderfull!!!

Baumfan1964, op 2014-10-16 20:26:41, zei:
ein Traum!!

MonumentalTrees.com · Register
Zichtbaar voor iedereen · permalink · en
gary1ozburn, op 2014-10-15 04:26:15, zei:
I looked at this site to see the tallest tree in South America. This pulled up your list of greatest girth, tallest, and oldest trees of "South America". Unfortunately a number of the greatest girth and all of the tallest are listed as being in Costa Rica. Costa Rica is not part of South America. I still do not have an answer.

Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-10-15 19:57:57, gewijzigd op 2014-10-15 20:00:12, zei:
Hi,

Indeed officially Costa Rica is a part of Central America, not of South America. Webmaster Tim can change that.

The few trees I put at this website from Costa Rica have been reliable measured with laser technology by Bart Bouricius from the USA. He has measured many trees in Tropical Rainforests in Costa Rica, but also in Panama and Peru and probably some more Latin American countries. These three trees are the tallest of all trees and species he has measured till now in Latin America.

Regarding South America Bart Bouricius has measured trees of several species in Peru, he writes he as well as an other measurer have measured trees in that country up to 58 m (190 feet).

Of South America we know very few reliable measurements, in Chile recently Josh Kelly has measured Alerce, Fitzroya cupressoides up to 54.1 m (177 ft) (so less than often reported as above 60 m) and of southern beech, Nothofagus dombeyi up to 49.2 m. See at the NTS website: http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewforum.php?f=44

andhttp://www.ents-bbs.org/viewforum.php?f=93 for the Central American reports.

We would like to have measurements at Monumental Trees of South American trees, but till now very few people have sent reports of trees they measured at this continent to this website.


KoutaR, op 2014-10-16 09:48:19, zei:
"Josh Kelly has measured Alerce, Fitzroya cupressoides up to 54.1 m (177 ft) (so less than often reported as above 60 m)"

But note that Mr. Kelly writes: "I doubt this is where remnant alerce trees reach their maximum size. My guess is that, like Nothofagus dombeyi, they reach their largest size on deep volcanic soils with high precipitation" and then lists some promising sites. His report is here: http://www.ents-bbs.org/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=5176#p22550



Frank Gyssling, op 2014-10-08 10:01:55, zei:
Hallo Jeroen,

ich habe gerade die Eiche merfach neu vermessen und komme in 1,3 m Höhe auf einen Umfang von mindestens 7,90 m. Das korrespondiert aber leider nicht mit deiner letzten Messung in 2010. Wobei, wie öfter bei solchen Bäumen, Fußpunkt (wo?) und Maserknollen die Messung schwierig machten.

viele Grüße Frank

Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-10-08 22:32:49, gewijzigd op 2014-10-09 06:22:22, zei:
Hello Frank,

I hope you can read English, in German I make a lot of faults with the "Fälle".

Kouta and I together measured this tree (see on the photo) and we did it at around 1.30 m above ground level, but this can be done above the high point or at the medium ground level. I don't remember how we did it in this case. Also, I try to get the smallest possible girth at or below 1.30 m, you can call it the "waist" = "taille". Since May 2010 five growing seasons have passed, for an open grown oak this could be 10 to 15 cm growth at breast hight. That means still 16 to 21 cm difference between our measurements. Sometimes a hollow tree seems to grow very fast because of "bulging out" (sagging) of the trunk. That seems to be the case with the biggest girthed oak of Kvill in Sweden. But in this case I would not expect this with this rather sound trunk. So compared to you probably Kouta and I measured at a higher point or less over burls.

Kind regards, Jeroen

KoutaR, op 2014-10-09 12:07:40, zei:
Ich weiss nicht mehr, wie wir den Fusspunkt definiert haben. Aber ich erinnere mich, dass Jeroen versucht hat, allen möglichen Knollen auszuweichen. Das könnte den Unterschied machen.
Frank Gyssling, op 2014-10-09 13:50:32, zei:
Hallo KoutaR,

ich werde ev. bei Gelegenheit noch mal hin fahren und erneut möglichst defensiv (optimal) und mit verschiedenen Fußpunkten messen. Die offene Frage ist, ob man trotz Maserknollen das Maßband noch mölichst wagerecht führt und im "Höhen-Zickzack-Kurs".

In einigen Quellen werden für diesen Baum Umfänge von > 8 m genannt.

viele Grüße Frank

KoutaR, op 2014-10-09 14:40:14, zei:
"Die offene Frage ist, ob man trotz Maserknollen das Maßband noch mölichst wagerecht führt und im "Höhen-Zickzack-Kurs"."

Jeroen, könntest du auf dies antworten.

Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-10-09 19:37:53, zei:
Hallo Frank und Kouta,

Wenn ich versuche die kleinst mögliche Umfang auf Brusthöhe zu bekommen, führ ich das Maßband zwischen Maserknollen eventuell etwas im "Höhen-Zickzack-Kurs". Das ist besser als horizontal über die Maserknollen, wenn es ein kleinere Umfang gibt.

Viele Grüße, Jeroen


Direction of development MT
Zichtbaar voor iedereen · permalink · nl
Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-06 17:01:45, gewijzigd op 2014-10-06 17:50:09, zei:
Hi all,

As this database is developing more and more into a podium where you can find all kinds of answers relating to pictures, growth, size and dispersion of all kinds of trees, in my opnion, there is a moment of realizing what we are doing and what our aims are.

Please don’t take it as an attack or offense. I saw that Karlheinz is very sincerely and thoroughly describing what we can see in the Kleve gardens in Germany. Karlheinz has an attitude inwhich he wants to be scientific and thorough.

I am wondering if that is what we should do here. If I take in account the detailed contributions of the Kleve gardens I soon stop scrollin

g the pictures. Off course that’s not a problem, but it poses the essential question of our focus or aim. What do we want? Scientific registration and documentation or something else?. Nice pics of trees that matter?. And do we want to influence laymen or other potentially interested people?.

I start thinking about a website where we can see the nice pictures or (on another place) view the scientific correct database about trees, what they are and where they are to be seen.

To be honest I would like to see both.

I would appreciate a site where you can see the champions per country, city or region. And in connection with that, I would like to go deeper and learn more about the characteristics of a special tree.

Is this a positive contribution? I hope so. It is intented so. I value the work of Tim. Next to that I think we have to help Tim in finding his way in accordance with the users and contributors of the site.

Crack your minds please and have a nice day.

Wim


RedRob, op 2014-10-06 17:19:57, gewijzigd op 2014-10-06 17:21:44, zei:
Simple answer for me, scientific registration and documentation for me, I come on here to view and see champion trees, my priority interest I admit is height but I also appreciate girth. I could upload pictures and register thousands of trees but I only register those of significant height either for species or location. The artistic photo thing does not bother me, I just want to see the trees whatever they look like. In truth the artistic element can be irritating as all it ever does is cause handbags at dawn with people upset at ratings of photographs. I would delete the rating system from this site if it was mine to end this dispute for good.

Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-06 17:25:38, zei:
My commitment in this discussion is not the rating. Nevertheless thank you very much for this opnion. We need that.

TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, op 2014-10-06 18:24:21, zei:
That's a good point, Wim. If the site were to feature every 'monumental tree' in the world there would be many millions and Tim would have to work even harder to keep the software running smoothly (and pay even more for bandwidth)! But many countries already have extensive, even near-comprehensive, databases of their notable trees. In Britain and Ireland, we have the Tree Register (with 215,000 trees) and the Ancient Tree Hunt (with 150,000 trees), and I've only transferred a very few of our best trees onto Monumental Trees, which I would like to see as a showcase for really special trees which can stimulate interest in a wider public (and act as a cross-borders forum for the initiated).

If anyone wants to find out about the rest of our UK and Irish trees, I hope that they would be sufficiently interested to join the Tree Register and consult its online database. The same applies for the USA, New Zealand and several European countries. Conversely, if anyone has an interest in updating and adding to the data on the Tree Register, I would hope that they would liaise directly with myself as Registrar. (A few trees have gone onto Monumental Trees instead and I have to search this site to find them and transfer them onto the Register. So long as it's only a few, this is a comment, not a complaint!)

Perhaps the links to individual countries' national tree database could be displayed more prominently on the main page of Monumental Trees, so that people with special interests are redirected to these sites. If Monumental Trees is to act as a large-scale database in its own right, I think some redesigning would be needed, so that it's quicker to draw up lists of, for example, particular species in particular provinces or counties, and to order these in different ways.


Tim, op 2014-10-06 19:15:17, zei:
I have stated my opinion on the goal of this website before. It is not my intention to copy or compete with national registries, it is merely about offering anyone the possibility to document loosely defined "trees of interest", so there is room for everybody: those that find pleasure in comprehensively documenting trees in an area, those that like to have a relaxing browse through photographs of interesting trees during some spare time in the evening, those that are merely interested what is to be seen in their neighborhood, those that have a scientific interest in how trees of a specific kind in this or that area compare to anywhere else in the world, to promote tree hunting, to offer statistics for the record hunters, to offer a possibility for photographers to share and persist their photo collection, ... , and yes, because I also like the technical aspect of it and for me it is rewarding to see that what I made as a hobby is actually being used by people and visited by many more. There is still a lot of potential towards the future, e.g. growth curves using historic measurements and - related - automatic age estimations.

That said, indeed, Owen, the "link" section http://www.monumentaltrees.com/en/content/links/ definately needs some updating (after which I could make it more prominent). I'm not sure who has edit rights there, but that page is editable, so feel free to add links to "official" tree registrers or databases anywhere in the world.

Kind regards,

Tim


Karlheinz, op 2014-10-06 23:55:22, zei:
Hallo Wim,

wir haben unterschiedliche Meinungen, welches Maß an Sorgfalt wir aufbringen sollten bei der Registrierung von Bäumen. Nach meiner Vorstellung soll die Baumdatenbank von MT nicht nur eine Plattform zur Präsentation eigener schöner Baumfotos sein, sondern wir wollen auch der Allgemeinheit eine verläßliche Informationsquelle bieten.

Wenn sich etwas als offensichtlich falsch herausstellt, sollte es erlaubt sein, das Problem anzusprechen und um Korrektur zu bitten. Ein Beispiel aus dem von dir angesprochenen Park in Kleve verdeutlicht, was ich meine:

douglasspar (Pseudotsuga menziesii) '16910'

Die Douglasie auf dem Foto hat nicht die Höhe und den Umfang des hier registrierten Baumes (ich habe gemessen: Umfang 3,04 m und Höhe 30,1 m), es muß also eine Verwechslung vorliegen. Das Baumschild auf dem zweiten Foto hängt nicht an diesem Baum, sondern an einer anderen Douglasie. In der Umgebung stehen mehrere Douglasien, einige auch erheblich höher (bis 38,80 m). Die registrierten Koordinaten sind ungenau und lassen eine Identifizierung des Baumes nicht zu. Bei solchen Ungereimtheiten macht es für nachfolgende User keine Freude, hier weitere Douglasien zu registrieren.

Grüße, Karlheinz

my English translation:

Hello Wim,

we have different opinions, what level of care we should apply for the registration of trees. In my idea the tree database of MT should not only be a platform to showcase our own beautiful tree photos, but we want to offer the public a reliable source of information.

If something obviously is found to be wrong, it should be allowed to address the issue and ask for correction. An example from the Kleve gardens, named by you, illustrates what I mean:

douglasspar (Pseudotsuga menziesii) '16910'

The Douglas fir in the photo does not have the height and the girth of the here registered tree (I measured girth 3.04 m and heigt 30.1 m), so there must be a confusion. The board on the second photo does not hang at this tree, but at another Douglas fir. In the surroundings there are several Douglas firs, some significantly higher (up to 38.80 m). The registered coordinates are inaccurate and do not allow an identification of the tree. With such inconsistencies it makes for following users no joy, to register more Douglas firs here.

Greetings, Karlheinz


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-07 14:26:39, zei:
Hallo Karlheinz,

I don't have any problem if you correct me. Be my guest if necessary, I also would like it if the information, of whatever kind, is correct.

Kind regards

WIm


RedRob, op 2014-10-07 16:45:27, zei:
Am I one of the guilty ones Owen, thought that you might be getting sick of emails and that you might pick them up on here but so many trees registered it is hard to keep up if you are away for a few days I admit.

Could the site be split, one part for scientific measurement, precise recording of location, photographing and ranking of significant trees (which also acts as a full record for these trees if they later happen to be lost or are felled) the other half for architectural trees for those who enjoy looking at the photographs and voting on composition. The two groups could then be happy.


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-07 18:07:56, zei:
Amazing.

Tim, op 2014-10-07 18:45:55, zei:
Hi Wim,

I read you apparently register trees with an inaccurate location and assign pictures of other trees to it, likely just to have that particular photo or photos uploaded.

That of course is not what should be done. Instead of expecting others to correct it for you, it would be much better not to enter incorrect data, and to refrain yourself from uploading pictures if you don't remember exactly of which tree it was. I for example have quite a few photos of great trees (e.g. chestnut trees in Corsica, or baobab trees in Zambia) from my travels which I did not upload, because I cannot find back the exact location.

Kind regards,

Tim


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-07 18:49:10, zei:
Dear friends,

I'm sorry if my contribution makes people believe that I am starting a controversy or antagonism. Please disregard my remarks. i will refrain from this kind of discussions. Apparently it is not appreciated.

Wim


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-07 19:06:00, zei:
Hi Tim, Your conclusion is inaccurate. I uploaded pictures with the correct coördinates. My exif data will prove that. Please don't jump to conclusions on an incorrect comment of Karlheinz.

Wim


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-07 19:19:03, zei:
Hi Tim,

A replenishment to my earlier reaction. I have spoken to you earlier about the fact that I didn't upload some beautiful trees in Mexico, because I didn't have the right coördinates. Since a few years nobody can accuse me of not posing the right coördinates. I have had about 4 camera's with gps function. So please ferfrain of accusations please. That's pissing me off.

Wim


Karlheinz, op 2014-10-08 06:14:03, zei:
The Tree Register or something similar, where large trees are documented, there is not in Germany. Who wants to document large trees with measured values ​​is dependent on Monumental Trees. In Germany there is still the Championtree list, where trees with thick trunks are recorded, but tree heights are rarely measured.

Karlheinz


Karlheinz, op 2014-10-08 10:34:01, zei:
Also my camera can store GPS locations in the Exif data area. But more exact coordinates I achieve with both my Garmin GPSMap 60csx and my modern smartphone Galaxy S5 with a suitable app. The accuracy is always dependent on the local situation and the care of my measurement. In special cases, I also measure by rangefinder the distances to striking objects in the terrain. Because a direct coordinate input in MT is not yet possible (hello Tim!), I set this measured position by the method "trial and error" in the map (satellite or map view). Then I check this position in the map for plausibility and correct if necessary.

In my experience the Exif coordinates in the photos of cameras and smart phones are a great help, it avoids rough error of positioning, you always will hit the right park. But for the exact positioning of the tree within the park, it is not enough in most cases. Of course there are differences in quality of the GPS features of cameras and and also your handling is crucial.

Karlheinz


TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, op 2014-10-08 17:55:34, zei:
A few more thoughts (Tim and Karlheinz). A record of a monumental tree is interesting straightaway, of course, but after 50 years or 100 years it will be even more valuable, because the tree will probably still be there but people might not know about it until the find the old record. (And we won't be there for them to ask.) The change in girth will then help people to estimate the ages of trees in more situations, without having to count the rings.

This means that it is worth thinking how the data on a site like Monumentaltrees might be curated and kept safe and available into the future. A paper record is easily curated, and a robust database can probably be kept up-to-date as technologies change. But I suspect that digital image files might not be decipherable in 50 years time, and a pin on a Google map certainly won't be! I've been able to relocate nearly all the trees recorded in Britain 50 or 100 years ago, even though at that time they didn't have GPS, or camera phones, or even map grid references, so I don't think that putting the icon on exactly the right spot on a map is necessarily essential.

If recorders want to adopt Monumentaltrees as the place to store their records of German trees, you might in the longer term even have to think about creating a charitable Trust to curate the site's information.


Tim, op 2014-10-08 18:46:02, zei:
That's right Owen. I also often think about that. As the data (measurements, locations, coordinates, image files) are all digital, they can in fact be stored and maintained indefinitely. All physical digital data carriers like e.g. dvds or hard disks eventually become unreadable, but as long as the data (which is just of sequence of 0's and 1's) is copied over once in a while, the data can live forever.

As I'm a still a young man (currently 32 years old) I plan to be around for many decades to come. The site's content is kept safe not only by the site's hosting company, but I also often make backups on dvds.

If I would be run over by a truck tomorrow, the site would probably stay alive and be accessible for a long time, as long as my automatic yearly payments are done. The data on the dvds would still available for anyone interested. Anyone with an even limited IT background would be able to get the info back. But indeed, in the long term, I would have to think how to share with others. Maybe even make the entire content downloadable by other registers or something.

Kind regards,

Tim


Karlheinz, op 2014-10-08 22:12:00, zei:
Owen, if all other details are contradictory, the coordinates would help you!

Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-10-09 06:32:25, zei:
One reason for Owen to be able to find many of the trees from descriptions of 50 to 100 years old is probably that these are mostly really big trees (often open grown) or very special species and specimens. Karlheinz often looks for very tall (but not especially fat) trees in forests, wich is more difficult.

But Karlheinz has the most exact methods of all members of MT. We cannot expect from all members to work as exact as he does, while MT is not an Academic research institute with professional scientifical goals.

Jeroen


Karlheinz, op 2014-10-09 12:59:12, zei:
Hello,

I do not claim for myself, to work using scientific methods and I do not expect that from other members. I will not make MT to an Academic research institute or something similar, I do not know who has put such thoughts into circulation. I am not saying that my measurements and records are error-free or that it would be the most accurate of all. I know and take into account the tolerances and limits of my own and by others commonly used measuring instruments and methods.

The point here is that a certain level of accuracy should be aimed and that there is the willingness to correct obvious errors. The stored data here must be traceable and verifiable for others. It must be allowed in MT, to report errors and to call for corrections, without one immediately be treated with subliminal hostility. A preservation of the status quo for the first registrator, or something as the right to sole ownership must not exist. An attitude "this is my tree, I have registered, keep out there!", I will not support. I have in mind that not only new trees are added, but also the database of the already registered trees will be maintained and updated (example: Wikipedia). If so I make unpopular myself with some members, I must live with. Should I have to recognize that MT developes in another direction, I see no future for me in MT.

Karlheinz



start58now, op 2014-07-29 21:26:05, zei:
So lucky are they.

GDH

Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-10-05 18:55:15, zei:
Fantastische foto. !!

Meerstammig of niet
Zichtbaar voor iedereen · permalink · nl
Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-09-30 18:52:00, gewijzigd op 2014-09-30 18:54:53, zei:
Hi Tim,

Ik heb vandaag een acer rubrum geregistreerd. rode esdoorn (Acer rubrum) '19478' met een afmeting van 2,78 m op 0,90 cm is het een respectabele boom. Als ik de lijst van Acer rubrums zie blijkt deze boom niet serieus genomen te worden. De door mij gedane meting komt niet tevoorschijn en de boom telt kennelijk niet mee. Dit verbaast me. Het is zeker geen meerstammige boom. Hij vertakt op 90 cm maar dat betekent niet dat hij meerstammig is, waarom verschijnt hij dan niet in de normale lijstjes.? Erg onbevredigend.

Kun je eea verhelderen.?

Wim


Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-09-30 19:09:10, zei:
Hoi Wim,

Heeft Tim toch eerder uitgelegd: de bomen verschijnen pas na enige tijd in de lijstjes, waardoor het totale systeem minder traag is geworden. Jouw esdoorn zal binnen enkele dagen in de lijsten verschijnen.

Jeroen


Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-09-30 19:18:23, zei:
Maar de boom verscheen al in het lijstje.....Alleen met een niet ingevulde meting..Dat had ik nog niet begrepen.

Ok..Ik wacht gewoon af.


Conifers, op 2014-09-30 20:22:02, zei:
Maybe the non-standard measuring height of 0.9 m excludes it from the 'stoutest' table? Just like multiple stems affects the 'true' girth of a tree, so does measurement at other than 1.3-1.5 m. I am guessing those two low branches are the reason for the 0.9 m measurement. Did you also measure the girth above those branches?

Wim Brinkerink, op 2014-09-30 20:38:16, zei:
I didn't. It didn't seem logical at the place. I will have another inspection to be sure.

TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, op 2014-10-01 17:07:43, zei:
On the Tree Register, we distinguish 'B' class trees, where the trunk can't be measured at the standard 1.5m but the measured girth is not significantly inflated by forks etc, from 'C' class trees, which do fork and where the measured girth can't be meaningfully compared with clean-boled trees. 'B' class trees can become girth-champions, while 'C' class trees only appear as alternative champions or as champions when the girth is very much bigger than any others.

On Monumental Trees, the distinction can also be made by answering yes/no to 'does the tree have multiple stems'. But I have noticed that some recorders (eg Red Rob) are answering 'yes' to this in the case of trees that fork higher up in their crown (and where the fork doesn't affect the girth, except that the crown will be broader and might power faster growth).


RedRob, op 2014-10-01 17:13:59, zei:
Hello Owen, which ones have I done incorrectly, will correct unless someone else will.

TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, op 2014-10-02 17:53:23, zei:
I remember the tall Grecian Fir at Bodnant appearing as a 'multi-stemmed' tree, and there was one other Bodnant one. From memory, the fork was well above the measured height.

Conifers, op 2014-10-02 20:12:10, zei:
I've unmultitrunked the Bodnant Greek Fir now

RedRob, op 2014-10-03 15:49:49, zei:
Thanks Conifers. I have sometimes hit the wrong choice with those last three questions when resgistering trees so please correct any of the others as well.

The 2005 37 metre Abies Cephalonica the laser recorded as 39.6 metres but I didn't photograph that one as the other was taller.



Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-09-29 22:13:05, gewijzigd op 2014-09-29 22:13:56, zei:
The Giant Sequoia of Nymans looks like an easy victim for lightening as it towers far above the surrounding trees. To the left also some Sequoia sempervirens.
TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, op 2014-10-01 17:15:01, zei:
When I first saw this tree in 1997, it had recently died back about 4 metres to 43m. This could have been lightning damage, though I suspect it was a consequence of the summer of 1995 which was exceptionally dry in Sussex and may have caused the small dieback I've noticed in a lot of Sequoiadendron (but not other species). At the time I wasn't expecting this tree to regrow very far, but I couldn't have been more wrong.

Though it's not clear in this photo, it grows in quite a steep, narrow valley, so that tree-crowns within 400m on almost all sides side rise above its tip. Once it's tip becomes exposed to the prevailing westerly wind, I suspect it will stop growing.

RedRob, op 2014-10-01 17:26:40, zei:
Any chance someone could visit Haslemere and Polecat Copse and take some new measurements and photograph the trees? Great place to visit when I visited several years ago, a very thin Coast Redwood just above the 51 metre Sequoiadendron intrigued me, took some photos on an old 2mp camera phone but they didn't come out as would be expected.

Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-09-29 21:45:08, zei:
Hi Rob,

Would be nice if you also measured the CBH of such trees, as it gives an impression of the growth just like the heightmeasurement as well as of the total woodvolume.

Jeroen


RedRob, op 2014-10-01 17:16:07, zei:
Apologies Jeroen, didn't think that the girth would have altered too much in 4 years so didn't go across the stream to girth it.


Stephen Verge, op 2014-09-16 07:26:04, zei:
Hi Rob

Wow at least 6 trees over 60m! How long are the leaders of these trees Rob? Any noticeable wind damage from last winter?

I saw these trees in the dark with the car headlights and kick myself for running out of time to see them last year, will have to return soon. Looks like the weather will change next week so may hold off holiday there, until another anticyclone arrives to ensure good weather in Wales.

Will be at Europe's largest forestry show on Sat in the Midlands so may look at impulse lasers and the new model out and may or may not be tempted! Trouble is that would I have the time to use it? 10 years ago definitely would.

Stephen


RedRob, op 2014-09-16 17:30:36, zei:
Hello Stephen, just run out of time with fiddling with the maps.

Six trees of 60 metres, the lot I bet are 60 metres if you could find windows in to measure them, the whole stand of probably nearing a hundred trees.


RedRob, op 2014-09-17 17:00:58, gewijzigd op 2014-09-17 17:26:35, zei:
Stephen, your visit on Saturday, I wouldn't be tempted would be my advice. Look, ascertain what you want but don't buy or else you will be robbed blind. Try sourcing the same instrument in Holland or the continent, you will get the same thing much cheaper, ridiculously cheaper. I got the Forestry Pro that I bought for half the price that they were being advertised over here. I couldn't have justified £500 odd quid for the laser but I am happy now with what I paid, I think that I have measured enough trees to justify it. Don't think that I could have ever have justified the price of one of the Impulse lasers, not for the number of trees that I have found and measured and am now likely to find in the future. I think you would have to be travelling the world measuring or a forestry professional or professional tree measurer to justify the Impulse. Judging by Karlheinz's and Kouta's recent measuring of the 59 metre Norway Spruce, the margin of error is not too bad for the Nikon Forestry Pro. We don't know if Kouta and Karlheinz chose precisely the same spot on the trunk to measure to so this is another error margin also Kouta may actually have had the correct spot and Karlheinz may have just been a tad high, we don't know but some of this probably accounts for the small difference.

Stephen Verge, op 2014-09-19 07:17:38, zei:
Rob

Many thanks for your sensible advice. Just a query if you purchase something from abroad, UK dealers are often rather awkward when it comes to service and repair? What do you think?

Will look and not touch and find out prices, with me I can offset against tax which is helpful.

Perhaps now I can return to Scotland as it remains now in UK! To measure big conifers!

Cheers

Stephen


RedRob, op 2014-09-20 15:51:42, gewijzigd op 2014-09-20 15:52:27, zei:
Hello Stephen, the Nikon Forestry Pro that I purchased has/had a 1 year manufacturers warranty which expired a year ago last July. A year on it is still going strong and hoping that it will not break. If it does at any point, it will probably cost nearly as much to repair as buying a new one so I wouldn't be getting it repaired and wouldn't be buying a new one. I think it comes down anyway to how you use the laser, I am ultra careful with mine, I don't let it dangle about from my neck letting it swing around as I am walking about, I hold it in my right hand horizontal and cushion it against jolts as I walk. As I have said umpteen times on here before, I roll my finger over the buttons at the top rather than pressing on them, I found early that this cuts down on agreat amount of laser movement at the time you press but it also cuts down on wear and tear on the buttons as well. I think with simple care and use, you can look after the laser and make it last. I always carefully clean the case and lens when I have finished with it before I put it away and so the laser still looks like new even though it is over 2 years old.

RedRob, op 2014-09-20 16:08:12, zei:
Are there many more tall trees, 50/60 metre conifers to measure in these Isles? Chic Henderson is busy up in Scotland measuring and re-measuring trees at places all over Scotland where tall trees have been reported over the years. He has recently been at a place called Adverike (think that is correct spelling just offhand) on Loch Laggan where some tall trees were reported a few years but have not heard the results yet, even Owen hasn't? From the silence he cannot have measured a new tallest tree in Britain can we presume? An area that I would like to find some tall trees is mid Wales and South Wales, been scouring Street View and the forests of South Wales, going up and down the network of roads and there appears to be some tall looking conifers, Douglas Firs I think, just south east of theA465 at Cwmgwrach just south west of Glynneath. The tallest tree currently recorded is a 50 metre Grand Fir at the Cefn park near Cardiff which Owen found and recorded.

Stephen, do you live in Oxford or further north? If you decide to get a laser, would you be near enough Belvoir Castle for a visit? I had hoped to visit but will not be getting right down there, at least this year? A 42 metre Quercus Robur was reported there, a 29 metre Yew and 32 metre Prunus Avium, the first two are probably exaggerated possibly not the latter but it would be good to see them and confirm?


Jeroen Philippona, op 2014-09-21 12:17:32, zei:
Hi Rob and Stephen,

My Nikon Forestry 550 is 5 years old now, very intensive used and not at all as careful handled by me, but still works fine. I have not heard from Kouta, Leo, Sisley, Nardo and many others that one of their Nikon laser instruments broke down till now. What I heard from long time users from the USA like Robert Leverett is also that their lasers work still after many years.

Jeroen


Stephen Verge, op 2014-09-22 10:18:38, zei:
Hey thanks for all of the above helpful info

I was at the forestry show on Sat and tried out the Trupulse 200x. Impressed but very expensive £1700!!! Obviously Nikon far cheaper.

Rob I would say there are many places in the UK to find tall trees but mainly Scotland. Yes Ardverikie Estate in the Highlands has miles of tall trees big Noble/Grand Firs along Loch Laggan.

I think your 67m Douglas would be the tallest outside of its native range in the Northern Hemisphere at least, but there are taller trees in New Zealand apparently.

Wondered if it would be interesting in Monumental trees to rank which European Country has the greatest number of trees/species say over 60m? Presumably Scotland first, then Wales then Germany? There must be over a 100 trees at 60m in the UK by now.

I think Noble and White Fir Hemlock, Giant Sequoia will reach 60m in time.

I was looking at pictures of tall Douglas in Germany perhaps not as many as in Scotland and a climate not so good for growth, but what could be more important is average wind speed less which could mean trees there suffer from less damage from gales as the trees are not within the 'Atlantic Storm track.' Possibly grow taller?

Thinking about going to Wales this week, undecided!

Stephen


Stephen Verge, op 2014-09-22 10:21:17, zei:
Rob

Belvoir is about 200 miles away, bit too far. But I know a cherry in The Chilterns which could be a champ for height, possibly over 30m!

Stephen


RedRob, op 2014-09-22 15:55:13, zei:
Hello Stephen, where do you live? From what you have posted it seemed like the Oxford area but Oxford is 105.7 miles away from Belvoir so you must be alot further south if it is 200 miles? Do you live on the south coast?


Meer...
 

Hoofdpagina · Begin van pagina · Deel/Bewaar

© MonumentalTrees.com · voorbehoud · ook beschikbaar in · Castellano · Deutsch · English · Français · vertalen?