Vous n'êtes pas connecté · connexion · régistrer
 
Ajoutez nouveau sujet

Discussions récentes

Plus...

Montrez seulement les discussions en français
Archives

Archives


Rayn, à 2014-09-20 19:49:46, a dit:
Is it known why it's called Schwedeneiche?
Rainer Lippert, à 2014-09-20 20:03:10, a dit:
Hallo Rayn,

im 30-jährigen Krieg, 1643, standen schwedische Truppen vor den Toren von Weida. Die Stadt wurde dann schließlich von den Schweden zurückerobert. Die Eiche wurde dann 1644 von der Bevölkerung aus Dankbarkeit zur Schwedeneiche erklärt. So die Erzählung.

Viele Grüße,

Rainer

Rayn, à 2014-09-21 09:51:16, a dit:
Thank you. Magnificent trees get even more interesting with a history.

Rainer Lippert, à 2014-09-20 22:02:37, a dit:
Oh, 0,5 als Bewertung, doch so viel.

Viele Grüße,

Rainer

Rayn, à 2014-09-21 09:49:48, a dit:
3.5 and counting...

The 'Owen Johnson Tree'.
Visible pour tous · permalink · en
RedRob, à 2014-09-20 16:19:32, édité à 2014-09-20 17:38:45, a dit:
sapin de Douglas (Pseudotsuga menziesii) '19364'

I don't know what the convention and protocol is for naming trees but I think that this tree deserves more than being called '19364'. I also think that this is a superb stand of trees which were brought to light more fully and recorded with no fanfair in 2005. I think that credit is deserving and recognition. I don't know as said what the convention is, can the first person to measure a tree add a name, but I would like to give this tree a name and it will be the 'Owen Johnson Tree'.

Owen, if you are not happy with this just say but I think that you are very deserving of recognition.


Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-21 06:51:33, a dit:
Naming a splendit tree is in my opinion a good habbit. And why name tree only after kings or queens or to remember certain occasions? In Kortenhoef a Elm is called "Luijt Postma tree" after a retiring coworker of our office of public works. So please give this tree this name.

Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-21 06:51:55, a dit:
Naming a splendit tree is in my opinion a good habbit. And why name tree only after kings or queens or to remember certain occasions? In Kortenhoef a Elm is called "Luijt Postma tree" after a retiring coworker of our office of public works. So please give this tree this name.


Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-21 06:39:14, a dit:
Wauw!

RedRob, à 2014-09-20 16:34:17, a dit:
Hello Rainer, great tree, do you have any longer distance photos that you could add? There is fore shortening in the photos that you have put on so the full height cannot be appreciated?

Rainer Lippert, à 2014-09-20 22:20:32, a dit:
Hallo RedRob,

nein, leider habe ich kein Foto von weiter weg. Man sieht diesen Baum auch nur recht schön von dieser Seite aus, von den anderen Seite her ist er von den Nachbarbäumen bedeckt.

Viele Grüße,

Rainer



Stephen Verge, à 2014-09-19 07:26:10, a dit:
Wow amazing!

Rob ever thought of purchasing one of those poles used in surveying so you can measure above the vegetation and add on accurately the remainder?

Stephen


RedRob, à 2014-09-20 16:11:23, a dit:
Good idea Stephen, many more trees have clear views to the base but some like these don't so it would be useful.

Meant to add about this tree and it's measurement, bought a new twin pack Lithium CR2 pack for this visit but after the initial measurement, changed to the new/spare battery to double check the reading in case of any battery drain on the first battery that I used or any fault. Same readings.


RedRob, à 2014-09-20 16:27:37, a dit:
Also meant to say, this tree looked sparser then the neighbouring trees in front of it, it was a more open tree which can actually be appreciated in the photos. Hoping that it hasn't got the needle drop disease or small signs of it? Maybe it is just a more open crowned speciman that the two denser, lusher specimans next to it.


Stephen Verge, à 2014-09-16 07:26:04, a dit:
Hi Rob

Wow at least 6 trees over 60m! How long are the leaders of these trees Rob? Any noticeable wind damage from last winter?

I saw these trees in the dark with the car headlights and kick myself for running out of time to see them last year, will have to return soon. Looks like the weather will change next week so may hold off holiday there, until another anticyclone arrives to ensure good weather in Wales.

Will be at Europe's largest forestry show on Sat in the Midlands so may look at impulse lasers and the new model out and may or may not be tempted! Trouble is that would I have the time to use it? 10 years ago definitely would.

Stephen


RedRob, à 2014-09-16 17:30:36, a dit:
Hello Stephen, just run out of time with fiddling with the maps.

Six trees of 60 metres, the lot I bet are 60 metres if you could find windows in to measure them, the whole stand of probably nearing a hundred trees.


RedRob, à 2014-09-17 17:00:58, édité à 2014-09-17 17:26:35, a dit:
Stephen, your visit on Saturday, I wouldn't be tempted would be my advice. Look, ascertain what you want but don't buy or else you will be robbed blind. Try sourcing the same instrument in Holland or the continent, you will get the same thing much cheaper, ridiculously cheaper. I got the Forestry Pro that I bought for half the price that they were being advertised over here. I couldn't have justified £500 odd quid for the laser but I am happy now with what I paid, I think that I have measured enough trees to justify it. Don't think that I could have ever have justified the price of one of the Impulse lasers, not for the number of trees that I have found and measured and am now likely to find in the future. I think you would have to be travelling the world measuring or a forestry professional or professional tree measurer to justify the Impulse. Judging by Karlheinz's and Kouta's recent measuring of the 59 metre Norway Spruce, the margin of error is not too bad for the Nikon Forestry Pro. We don't know if Kouta and Karlheinz chose precisely the same spot on the trunk to measure to so this is another error margin also Kouta may actually have had the correct spot and Karlheinz may have just been a tad high, we don't know but some of this probably accounts for the small difference.

Stephen Verge, à 2014-09-19 07:17:38, a dit:
Rob

Many thanks for your sensible advice. Just a query if you purchase something from abroad, UK dealers are often rather awkward when it comes to service and repair? What do you think?

Will look and not touch and find out prices, with me I can offset against tax which is helpful.

Perhaps now I can return to Scotland as it remains now in UK! To measure big conifers!

Cheers

Stephen


RedRob, à 2014-09-20 15:51:42, édité à 2014-09-20 15:52:27, a dit:
Hello Stephen, the Nikon Forestry Pro that I purchased has/had a 1 year manufacturers warranty which expired a year ago last July. A year on it is still going strong and hoping that it will not break. If it does at any point, it will probably cost nearly as much to repair as buying a new one so I wouldn't be getting it repaired and wouldn't be buying a new one. I think it comes down anyway to how you use the laser, I am ultra careful with mine, I don't let it dangle about from my neck letting it swing around as I am walking about, I hold it in my right hand horizontal and cushion it against jolts as I walk. As I have said umpteen times on here before, I roll my finger over the buttons at the top rather than pressing on them, I found early that this cuts down on agreat amount of laser movement at the time you press but it also cuts down on wear and tear on the buttons as well. I think with simple care and use, you can look after the laser and make it last. I always carefully clean the case and lens when I have finished with it before I put it away and so the laser still looks like new even though it is over 2 years old.

RedRob, à 2014-09-20 16:08:12, a dit:
Are there many more tall trees, 50/60 metre conifers to measure in these Isles? Chic Henderson is busy up in Scotland measuring and re-measuring trees at places all over Scotland where tall trees have been reported over the years. He has recently been at a place called Adverike (think that is correct spelling just offhand) on Loch Laggan where some tall trees were reported a few years but have not heard the results yet, even Owen hasn't? From the silence he cannot have measured a new tallest tree in Britain can we presume? An area that I would like to find some tall trees is mid Wales and South Wales, been scouring Street View and the forests of South Wales, going up and down the network of roads and there appears to be some tall looking conifers, Douglas Firs I think, just south east of theA465 at Cwmgwrach just south west of Glynneath. The tallest tree currently recorded is a 50 metre Grand Fir at the Cefn park near Cardiff which Owen found and recorded.

Stephen, do you live in Oxford or further north? If you decide to get a laser, would you be near enough Belvoir Castle for a visit? I had hoped to visit but will not be getting right down there, at least this year? A 42 metre Quercus Robur was reported there, a 29 metre Yew and 32 metre Prunus Avium, the first two are probably exaggerated possibly not the latter but it would be good to see them and confirm?



Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-20 07:22:26, a dit:
Lovely, the nearby waterflow in this picture. Thanks for that, martin

Conifers, à 2014-09-18 16:28:55, a dit:
Chamaecyparis pisifera, recognisable by the cone shape and size, and shoot structure.
Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-20 07:14:00, a dit:
Frank,

This is not Ch. lawsoniana. I think Conifers is spot on right with Ch. pisifera. A Lawson's cipres is not so open and transparent.

Greeting, Martin


Stephen Verge, à 2014-09-17 07:04:18, a dit:
Hello Owen

A very impressive stand of trees for that part of the country! It may be that the North Sea moderates the climate somewhat here? Although to a lesser degree than say the New Forest on the channel coast? Any Sitka there?

There is a Douglas just north of Henley, Oxon (close to me) which is almost as tall planted 1917 and still growing (on chalk!) Possibly tallest tree in Oxon if not Bucks and Berks.

Stephen


RedRob, à 2014-09-17 16:48:31, a dit:
I agree with Stephen, abit of a surprise but an impressive one. The Grand Fir is very impressive. I do abit of plane spotting and have been to RAF Lakenheath several times and the soil there is like dust-sandy,dry. As said to someone, amazing that the conifers in Thetford Forest can survive in the soil. I imagine it will be very dry at the moment as it has been very dry in Eastern England for the last few weeks.

TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, à 2014-09-18 17:53:23, a dit:
Yes, I think the North Sea does help conifer growth in Norfolk - the most stressful conditions are often when there's a dry hot easterly wind and this will be cooler (and moister) when blowing off the North Sea.

There aren't any Sitkas at Weasenham Woods but at another of the Coke family's 19th century experiments in continuous-cover forestry, Fulmodeston Severals, there is a (youngish) plantation with trees to 37m. Again rather remarkable, as this tree really doesn't like it hot and dry.


TheTreeRegisterOwenJohnson, à 2014-09-18 17:55:04, a dit:
Stephen,

I remember you mentioning the Douglas Fir near Henley before. I think there are a few of your records that have not yet found their way onto the Tree Register, for one reason or the other - this is one. It certainly sounds like the tallest tree in the Home Counties area - perhaps you would be able to add it to this site?

Owen


Stephen Verge, à 2014-09-19 07:11:48, a dit:
Thanks Owen and Rob

Of interest to tree growth and climate from the Met Office averages 1981-2010, (On climate section on Met Office site can't post hyper link here) shows average rainfall of 700-800mm for North Norfolk, slightly less than The Chilterns where I am, 800-1000mm over higher parts, hence growth of conifers is slightly better than other Home County areas. Also shows why conifer growth/productivity is some of the best in the cool temperate world in Wales and the North West UK.

Owen I am reluctant to submit tangent measurements due to their possible inaccuracies, which may or may not be correct, but would be I hope within + or - 2m. Until I get a laser?

Owen

Do you know the giant Sessile Oak near the Mezel Depot in Windsor Great Park next to the park junction? Mentioned in Alans book as 125ft x 20ft (magnificent as any) Probably the oldest oak I have encountered, because adjacent Sessile about 390-400 years based on a solid ring count! Will do report on this for monumental trees soon. It says avenue was planted in 1751!

Regards

Stephen



RedRob, à 2014-09-16 17:20:26, édité à 2014-09-16 17:27:49, a dit:
When I press on 'Show on Map' the Google Map is close with individual trees visible. Press to change the location the map has panned out and I cannot get it to zoom in, I have to just stick a red bubble. Conifers, would you be able to put this directly in front of the 65 metre tree.

RedRob, à 2014-09-16 17:28:15, a dit:
Zooming in now, intermittant problem.

Conifers, à 2014-09-16 20:40:38, a dit:
Done!

RedRob, à 2014-09-18 16:39:27, a dit:
Thank you Conifers, able to move them to the exact spot once you have stuck them near.


Martin Tijdgat, à 2014-09-18 13:55:35, a dit:
Wouter,

Vraag het Tim deze fraaie Zilverlinde rechtop te zetten. Verander je zelf de status van nog niet gedetermineerde boom naar Tilia tomentosa?



derWaldfotograf, à 2014-09-18 13:31:37, a dit:
Stamm der Sommerlinde (Kirche im Hintergrund)

derWaldfotograf, à 2014-09-18 13:29:33, a dit:
Smmerlinde (von der Kirche)

Wim Brinkerink, à 2014-09-17 16:20:05, a dit:
Het is mij niet duidelijk wie aan de beschrijving een verhaal over meten op verschillende hoogtes heeft opgeschreven. Mijn ervaringen stroken daarmee. Ik heb nadrukkelijk het centrum van de boom opgezocht, maar daar alleen meten is hachelijk. Het is de kunst om het meetlint strak te houden en steeds te letten op 1.30 meter. Mijn eerste meting kwam uit op 6,57 meter en mijn tweede en derde op 6,56 en 6,49. Ik probeerde met alle macht het lint strak te trekken op de middenpositie. Uiteindelijk lukte me dat (denk ik) en ik kwam op 6,38 meter. Ik had van tevoren wel wat gegevens verzameld en in mijn gegevens stond een hoogte van 6,10 meter. Ik kan die hoogte absoluut niet aan mijn praktijkervaring koppelen.

Jeroen Philippona, à 2014-09-17 20:54:54, édité à 2014-09-17 20:55:47, a dit:
Hallo Wim,

Het stukje tekst over het meten is van mij. De laatste keer dat ik er aan het meten ben geweest was dit voorjaar samen met Corine van Dun, hoofdredacteur van Bomennieuws. Bomen op hellingen zijn lastig te meten, als je de methode hanteert van het centrum van de boom, waar de boom ooit ontkiemde of werd geplant, kom je bij heel dikke bomen op steile hellingen soms onder het hoogste punt rond de stam uit. Bij bomen op zo'n locatie is het aardig op verschillende hoogtes te meten. Wat je bedoelt met die hoogte van 6,10 m is me niet duidelijk.

Jeroen


Wim Brinkerink, à 2014-09-18 08:58:31, a dit:
Hallo Jeroen,

Lees voor 6,10 svp 6,18. 6,10 zat onterecht in mijn hoofd, dat moest 6,18 zijn. Ik had een overzichtje meegenomen met maten zoals ze op MT staan. Maar als ik jouw verhaal lees dan zou je toch een omtrek van 6,46 m moeten registreren? Of is de eerder door jou beschreven meetrichtlijn niet zo algemeen? Ik hou me er in ieder geval zo goed mogelijk aan, maar aarzel om 6,38 aan te geven. (wat volgens mij een juistere meting dan 6,18 zou zijn). (Overigens verklaart dat nog niet het verschil met jouw meting van 6,46 m.)

WIm



Plus...
 

Page d'accueil · Retour haut de page · Partager/Enregistrer

© MonumentalTrees.com · avertissement · aussi disponible en · Castellano · Deutsch · English · Nederlands · traduire?